top of page
Inside this Book

If you make use of this material, you may credit the authors as follows:

Tarlow Sarah and Battell Lowman Emma, "Harnessing the Power of the Criminal Corpse", Springer Nature, 2018, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-77908-9, License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

This open access book is the culmination of many years of research on what happened to the bodies of executed criminals in the past. Focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it looks at the consequences of the 1752 Murder Act. These criminal bodies had a crucial role in the history of medicine, and the history of crime, and great symbolic resonance in literature and popular culture. Starting with a consideration of the criminal corpse in the medieval and early modern periods, chapters go on to review the histories of criminal justice, of medical history and of gibbeting under the Murder Act, and ends with some discussion of the afterlives of the corpse, in literature, folklore and in contemporary medical ethics. Using sophisticated insights from cultural history, archaeology, literature, philosophy and ethics as well as medical and crime history, this book is a uniquely interdisciplinary take on a fascinating historical phenomenon.

Keywords

History, Great Britain—history, History, Crime—sociological Aspects, Historical Sociology, Social History

Rights | License

Except where otherwise noted, this item has been published under the following license:

You might also be interested in the following books from Amazon:

Takedown policy:

If you believe that this publication infringes copyright, please contact us at info@jecasa-ltd.com and provide relevant details so that we can investigate your claim.

!
Widget Didn’t Load
Check your internet and refresh this page.
If that doesn’t work, contact us.
!
Widget Didn’t Load
Check your internet and refresh this page.
If that doesn’t work, contact us.
!
Widget Didn’t Load
Check your internet and refresh this page.
If that doesn’t work, contact us.
bottom of page