top of page

Shaping Natural History and Settler Society

Inside this Book

If you make use of this material, you may credit the authors as follows:

Hammel Tanja, "Shaping Natural History and Settler Society", Springer Nature, 2019, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-22639-8, License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

This book explores the life and work of Mary Elizabeth Barber, a British-born settler scientist who lived in the Cape during the nineteenth century. It provides a lens into a range of subjects within the history of knowledge and science, gender and social history, postcolonial, critical heritage and archival studies. The book examines the international importance of the life and works of a marginalized scientist, the instrumentalisation of science to settlers' political concerns and reveals the pivotal but largely silenced contribution of indigenous African experts. Including a variety of material, visual and textual sources, this study explores how these artefacts are archived and displayed in museums and critically analyses their content and silences. The book traces Barber’s legacy across three continents in collections and archives, offering insights into the politics of memory and history-making. At the same time, it forges a nuanced argument, incorporating study of the North and South, the history of science and social history, and the past and the present.

Keywords

History, History, Imperialism, Africa, Sub-saharan—history, Gender Identity

Rights | License

Except where otherwise noted, this item has been published under the following license:

Takedown policy

If you believe that this publication infringes copyright, please contact us at info@jecasa-ltd.com and provide relevant details so that we can investigate your claim.

bottom of page